Cythia Chigara
#Graduate
Cythia Chigara  -   Postgraduate Diploma in Health Science

Born and raised Zimbabwean Cythia Chigara recently graduated from the Postgraduate Diploma in Health Science programme with the Southern Institute of Technology (SIT).

Following completion of a Bachelor of Science Honours Degree in Nursing Science in 2003, Cythia commenced work as a Registered General Nurse in Zimbabwe.

She then registered to practice nursing in New Zealand in 2005, relocated here in 2006 and has been working in older persons’ health for the past nine years.

Cythia says she had been considering enrolment in postgraduate education for a while, to enhance her knowledge and skills in healthcare for the older person.

“However I was initially apprehensive about managing full time employment as well as meeting educational obligations.”

A friend enrolled at SIT and told Cythia that the Advanced Practice to Support Older Person’s Wellbeing paper was being offered.

“This encouraged me to enrol with SIT as we could car pool together and support each other with studies,” Cythia says.

“I also enrolled in the applied pharmacology, advanced clinical and diagnostic reasoning as well as advancing specialist practice papers so to achieve a Postgraduate Diploma in Health Science qualification.”

She says studying with SIT has enhanced her skills and knowledge of the healthcare system in New Zealand.

“In addition evaluating and critiquing research in health has enhanced my understanding of evidence-based practice to influence care provision within my work environment.”

Cythia thoroughly enjoyed the postgraduate diploma programme and says the lecturers were extremely supportive and always available to provide guidance where necessary.

“The programme has equipped me to overcome challenges that may present in practice as well as provide quality health care,” she says.

“At present I intend to use all the knowledge gained to support my practice.

“Learning is an ongoing process and hence in the near future I will pursue further health studies.”