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New Zealand Certificate in Animal Care (Level 3)
New Zealand Certificate in Animal Care (Level 3)

New Zealand Certificate in Animal Care (Level 3)

New Zealand Certificate in Animal Care

Nurture your passion for animals with the New Zealand Certificate in Animal Care. Become a valued member of your local animal shelter or clinic, learn how to care for your own animals or pathway into a higher animal care qualification.

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Key Details
Telford
Qualification:
Certificate
Level:
3
Credits:
70
Duration:

23 Weeks

 

Study Modes:
On Campus
Dates:

2022 Semester 1: 27 June to 02 December

Fees:

Domestic Fees: $888.00

International Fees

Nurture your passion for animals with the New Zealand Certificate in Animal Care. Become a valued member of your local animal shelter or clinic, learn how to care for your own animals or pathway into a higher animal care qualification.

With the focus in lifestyle block animals this qualification is ideal for those in the rural industry sector or who would like to pursue a career in rural animal care.

You will learn:

  • Animal Anatomy and Physiology
  • Health and Behaviour
  • Animal Ethics and Legalities
  • Three specialised areas for Identification, Health and Housing for Dogs, Horses, Poultry, Rodent and Rabbits, or Ruminants (cattle, sheep and deer).

This qualification will help you develop skills needed for working or further training in the animal care industry.

ACS100 Zoonoses and Their Control (8 credits)

This paper provides students with knowledge of the lifecycles, signs of disease and means of control for common zoonotic pathogens which may be encountered when dealing with companion and/or lifestyle block animals.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  1. Illustrate the lifecycle of viral, viral-like, bacterial and fungal zoonoses in New Zealand.
  2. Illustrate the lifecycle of protozoal and parasitic diseases in New Zealand.
  3. Describe the signs of zoonotic disease in animals and humans.
  4. Explain policies and methods for preventing the spread of zoonoses in an animal handling facility.
  5. Illustrate methods for preventing the spread of zoonoses in a lifestyle block or private dwelling.
  6. Identify and describe the methods utilised to prevent the spread of notifiable exotic zoonoses in New Zealand.

ACS101 Animal Anatomy and Physiology (10 credits)
This paper provides students with knowledge of the basic anatomy and physiology of common companion and lifestyle block animals in New Zealand.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the structure and processes of animal cells.
  2. Compare the structure, location, and function of epithelial tissue, connective tissue, muscular tissue and nervous tissue in specified companion/lifestyle block animals.
  3. Compare the basic anatomy and function of skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, reproductive, urinary, integumentary, endocrine, lymphatic, and nervous systems; special senses and homeostatis in specified companion/lifestyle block animals.

ACS102 Ethical and Legal Behaviour in Relation to Animals (7 credits)
This paper provides students with knowledge of the ethical and legal considerations in relation to animal care and handling in New Zealand.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the difference between a code of practice and New Zealand legislation.
  2. Identify codes of practice relevant to animal welfare and their relation to the Animal Welfare Act 1999 (including amendments).
  3. Describe local by-laws with regard to animal welfare including how local by-laws are enacted by local government.
  4. Describe the roles of the Ministry for Primary Industries and the National Animal Ethics Advisory Committee with regard to animal welfare in New Zealand.

ACS103 Normal and Abnormal Behaviour and Emergency Procedures (5 credits)  

ACS103 and ACS104 must be done together as the course work and assessments are integrated.
This paper provides students with knowledge and skills necessary to recognize normal and abnormal animal behaviour and when appropriate emergency procedures need to be considered/put in place.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast normal and abnormal behaviour for common companion and/or lifestyle block animals in New Zealand.
  2. Describe a range of emergency procedures.
  3. Identify appropriate times to employ emergency procedures on the basis of behaviour being exhibited.

ACS104 Basic Animal Health Procedures and First Aid (5 credits)
ACS103 and ACS104 must be done together as the course work and assessments are integrated.
This paper provides students with knowledge necessary to undertake basic health procedures and apply first aid for common companion and/or lifestyle block animals in New Zealand.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  • Describe the basic health procedures for a range of companion and/or lifestyle block animals in New Zealand.
  • Identify potential risks to animal handlers when undertaking animal health checks or undertaking first aid measures and how these risks may be avoided or minimised.
  • Identify occasions when first aid measures are warranted.
  • Evaluate the efficiency and usefulness of different first aid measures.

ACS105 Signs of Ill Health in Animals (5 credits) 
This paper provides students with knowledge necessary to identify the signs of ill health in common companion and/or lifestyle block animals in New Zealand.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the difference between signs of ill health and abnormal behaviour.
  2. Describe the signs of ill health in common companion and/or lifestyle block animals in New Zealand.

ACS106 Dog Identification, Health and Housing (10 credits)
This paper provides students with knowledge necessary to identify individual dogs and breeds, describe indicators of good and ill health in dogs, provide appropriate nutrition for dogs, identify housing requirements for dogs, and explain safe handling techniques for dogs.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and describe individual dogs and breeds.
  2. Describe indicators of good health in dogs.
  3. Describe indicators of ill health in dogs.
  4. Describe the nutritional needs of different dog breeds and how these change over the animal’s lifetime.
  5. Describe housing requirements (including hygiene requirements) for dogs.
  6. Illustrate safe handling and transportation techniques for dogs.

ACS107 Horse Identification, Health and Housing (10 credits)
This paper provides students with knowledge necessary to identify individual horses and breeds, describe indicators of good and poor health in horses, provide appropriate nutrition for horses, identify housing requirements for horses, and explain safe handling techniques for horses.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and describe individual horses and breeds.
  2. Describe indicators of good health in horses.
  3. Describe indicators of ill health in horses.
  4. Describe the nutritional needs of different horse breeds and how these change over the animal’s lifetime.
  5. Describe housing requirements (including hygiene requirements) for horses.
  6. Illustrate safe handling and transportation techniques for horses.

ACS110 Ruminant Identification, Health and Housing (10 credits)

This paper provides students with knowledge necessary to identify different ruminant breeds, describe indicators of good and ill health in ruminants, provide appropriate nutrition for ruminants, identify housing requirements for ruminants, and explain safe handling techniques for ruminants.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and describe individual ruminants and different breeds.
  2. Describe indicators of good health in ruminants.
  3. Describe indicators of ill health in ruminants.
  4. Describe the nutritional needs of different ruminant breeds and how these change of the animal’s lifetime.
  5. Describe housing requirements (including hygiene requirements) for ruminants.
  6. Illustrate safe handling and transportation techniques for ruminants.

Graduates of the New Zealand Certificate in Animal Care (Lifestyle Block Animals) (Level 3) will have solid basic knowledge and skills in the care of animals of varying sizes who are suited to lifestyle blocks.

Many graduates of the New Zealand Certificate in Animal Care (Lifestyle Block Animals) (Level 3) go on to further study, however some graduates have chosen to use the course to meet personal goals such as increasing their level of care for their own pets and livestock, or volunteering for local animal welfare organisations.

School Leavers
Applicants should be a minimum of 16 years of age, and have attained NCEA Level 2 as follows:

  • 60 credits at Level 2 or above, plus 20 credits from any level, and
  • Literacy – minimum of 10 credits at Level 1 or above through either specified assessment standards available through a range of subjects and English for Academic Purposes, unit standards 22750 and 22751 (minimum total of 10 credits), or unit standards – package of three literacy unit standards (26622, 26624, 26625 – all three required)
  • Numeracy – a minimum of 10 credits at Level 1 or above through either achievement standards – specified assessment standards available through a range of subjects (minimum total of 10 credits), or unit standards – package of three numeracy unit standards (26623, 26626, 26627 – all three required)

Mature Applicants
Applicants over the age of 20 years at time of enrolment will be considered where they can demonstrate the ability to succeed in a programme. Examples of demonstration of ability to succeed are the provision of evidence of successful completion of a programme of study at Level 2 or above and/or employment in the related sector for one or more years. They may be admitted subject to programme regulations approved by the head of faculty in consultation with the programme manager as appropriate. Personal commitment and a belief in one’s own ability to succeed are important personal traits and will always be taken into consideration during the selection process.

English Language Requirements

Applicants, whose first language is not English, or who come from a country where the language of instruction in schools is not English, are required to provide evidence of having achieved one of the following

NCEA Level 3 with University Entrance, or

an International Baccalaureate Diploma or Cambridge A- level qualification for which the teaching and assessment was conducted in English; or

Cambridge Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA),or Trinity College London Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CertTESOL);or

Successful completion of all primary education (being the equivalent of New Zealand primary school years 1 to 8) and at least three years of secondary education (being the equivalent of three years from New Zealand secondary school years 9 to 13) at schools in either New Zealand,,Australia,Canada, the Republic of Ireland, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States one of the countries listed in Rule 18.5 where the student was taught using English as the language of instruction; or

Successful completion of at least five years of secondary education (being the equivalent of New Zealand secondary school years 9 to 13) at schools in either New Zealand, Australia, Canada, the Republic of Ireland, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States where the student was taught using English as the language of instruction; or

Successful completion of a Bachelor's Degree, Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma, Bachelor Honours degree, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma, Masters' Degree or Doctoral Degree, the language of instruction of which must be in English and which must be from a tertiary education provider from New Zealand, Australia, Canada, the Republic of Ireland, South Africa, the United Kingdom or the United States or

Successful completion of one of the following internationally recognised proficiency tests listed below to the level required of the programme of study and with all scores achieved in a single test during the two years preceding the proposed date of enrolment


IELTS test - General or Academic score of 5 with no band score lower than 5
TOEFL Paper based test (pBT) - Score of 500 (with an essay score of 4 TWE)
TOEFL Internet based test (iBT) - Score of 35 (with a writing score of 14)
Cambridge English Examination - B2 First or B2 First for schools with a score of 154. No less than 154 in each skill.
OET - Minimum of Grade C or 200 in all sub-tests
NZCEL - a) Expiring Level b) Current: a) Level 3 (General) or (Workplace) b) Level 3 (General)
Pearson Test of English (Academic) - PTE (Academic) score of 36 with no band score lower than 36
Language Cert - B1 Achiever IESOL (LRWS) with PASS and no less than PASS in each skill
Trinity ISE - ISE I with no less than distinction in any band

* New versions of some NZCEL qualifications, and in some cases new qualifications, were published on 13 June 2017. These are intended to replace pre-existing versions and qualifications, which have been given expiring status until discontinued on 31 December 2019. (a) denotes expiring (b) denotes current

To satisfactorily complete the New Zealand Certificate in Animal Care (Fish, Horses, Companion Animals, and Lifestyle Block Animals) (Level 3), and be awarded this qualification the student must successfully achieve:

  •  A minimum of 70 credits in accordance with the Programme schedule for the New Zealand Certificate in Animal Care (Fish, Horses, Companion Animals, and Lifestyle Block Animals) (Level 3)
  • The student will normally be expected to complete the New Zealand Certificate in Animal Care (Fish, Horses, Companion Animals, and Lifestyle Block Animals) (Level 3) full-time over 6 months or part-time over 2 years

Please Note: Students failing to engage in study as per programme requirements may forfeit Zero Fees entitlement.

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