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New Zealand Certificate in Study and Career Preparation (Level 3) - Pre Entry Applied Health Science
New Zealand Certificate in Study and Career Preparation (Level 3) - Pre Entry Applied Health Science

New Zealand Certificate in Study and Career Preparation (Level 3) - Pre Entry Applied Health Science

New Zealand Certificate in Study and Career Preparation (Level 3)

Do you enjoy helping others? Are you interested in learning more about the human body and how it functions? Are you keen on starting or shifting your career to the health field?If you dream of studying Nursing, Health and Wellness, or Applied Science (Laboratory Technician) at tertiary level, but do not have the necessary entry requirements, the New Zealand Certificate in Study and Career Preparation (Level 3) may be right for you.

 

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Key Details
Invercargill
Qualification:
Certificate
Level:
3
Credits:
60
Duration:

20 Weeks Full-time

Study Modes:
On Campus
Dates:

2022 Semester 1: 01 February to 17 June

2022 Semester 2: 04 July to 18 November

Fees:

This programme is eligible for the Zero Fees Scheme.

  • No Tuition Fees
  • Direct Material Costs $255.00

If you dream of studying Nursing, Health and Wellness, or Applied Science (Laboratory Technician) at tertiary level, but do not have the necessary entry requirements, the New Zealand Certificate in Study and Career Preparation (Pre Entry Applied Health Science) (Level 3) may be right for you.

In addition to core subject such as anatomy and physiology, human biology, mathematics, and mental health, learners will also learn about professional relationships, cultural identities, teamwork and ethics.

Interested learners please note: all papers are compulsory and must be completed in the order listed below.

AHS100 Introduction to normal human structure and function in a health context (8 credits)

This paper introduces students to normal human structure and function (e.g. those physiological structures and functions that are not impaired by abnormalities or dysfunction) within a health context.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  1. Define and describe the difference between the terms "anatomy" and "physiology"
  2. Describe the normal structure of the musculoskeletal, integumentary, respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, nervous, reproductive, urinary, lymphatic, and endocrine systems.
  3. Describe the normal function of the musculoskeletal, integumentary, respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, nervous, reproductive, urinary, lymphatic, and endocrine systems.

AHS101 Introduction to abnormal human structure and function in a health context (8 credits)

This paper introduces students to abnormal human system structure and function (i.e. those which are in some way different from a normal or healthy state) and provides the skills and knowledge to describe complementary philosophies and a range of health care interventions.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  1. Describe and provide examples of potential causes of at least two abnormal conditions structure for the musculoskeletal, integumentary, respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, nervous, reproductive, urinary, lymphatic, and endocrine systems.
  2. Compare at least two complementary philosophies (e.g. based on cultural and spiritual precepts, and holistic and complementary practices) related to abnormal human structure and function.
  3. Describe at least two health care interventions for abnormal human structure and function related to medication, non-mediation, invasive, non-invasive, psychological and spiritual therapies.

AHS102 Human biology (10 credits)

This paper introduces students to human anatomy and physiology.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the structure and function, and provide examples of cells and tissues, skeletal, muscular, digestive, respiratory, circulatory, urinary, reproductive, endocrine, integumentary systems of humans.
  2. Discuss the integration of the human bodily systems structure and function.

AHS103 Measurements, scientific notations and units (10 credits)

This paper introduces students to the basic System International (SI) units of measurement and the derived units used in the applied health sciences. Students will gain the functional mathematical skills and knowledge to undertake quantity calculations and use formulae to solve problems.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  1. Apply the basic rules of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division for whole numbers, fractions, and decimal numbers.
  2. Undertake mathematical functions through the application of the rules of order of operations.
  3. Identify and describe common fractions and their decimal equivalents.
  4. Identify and describe at seven base units and at least 10 derived units in SI nomenclature.
  5. Perform calculations of length, mass, volume, and temperature in the metric system, including conversion of non-metric units to metric units.

AHS104 Ethics in applied health sciences (8 credits)

This paper introduces students to ethical behavior and consumer rights in an applied health sciences context, including disability and community settings.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  1. Describe relevant legislation and codes of conduct relating to consumer rights, confidentiality, informed consent, and independent choice in health care, disability and community contexts.
  2. Describe relevant legislation and codes of conduct relating to ethical behaviour in a health care context, including how personal values, cultural practices, ethical requirements and consumer rights can all be respected in applied health sciences, including disability and community contexts.

AHS105 Teamwork in applied health sciences (3 credits)

This paper provides students with the skills and knowledge necessary to participate in a team to achieve agreed outcomes in an applied health sciences context.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  1. Describe teamwork in terms of benefits to health context outcomes and the differences between leading a team and participating in a team.
  2. Identify and discuss potential barriers to effective teamwork and actions which could be used to overcome these barriers.
  3. Identify own role within a team and explore actions which would assist the team in meeting its goals.

AHS106 Professional relationships in applied health sciences (4 credits)

This paper provides students with an insight to the professional relationships between applied health sciences practitioners important to health care provision.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  1. Describe different professional relationships which may be established between health care practitioners, both mainstream and complementary.
  2. Describe the roles and responsibilities in group processes in a health care context.

AHS107 Cultural identities in applied health sciences (6 credits)

This paper provides students the knowledge and insight to describe their own, and other, cultural identities and the influence of cultural identity on work practices and policies, procedures, and resources used to assist in responding to culture-related issues in applied health sciences.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  1. Describe own cultural identity and the influence of this on own work practices in an applied health sciences context.
  2. Describe other cultural identities and the influence of these on own work practices in an applied health sciences context.
  3. Describe policies, procedures, and resources which are used to assist in responding to culture-related issues in an applied health sciences context.

AHS108 Mental health in applied health sciences (3 credits)

This paper introduces students to the factors that contribute to mental health wellbeing and mental health issues.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

  1. Describe factors that contribute to mental health wellbeing, in terms of lifestyle choices and strengthening a person's capacity to deal with stressful life events.
  2. Describe factors that have the capacity to contribute to mental health issues which may increase a person's vulnerability to stressful life events.

Applicants should demonstrate a likelihood of success in the programme of study.

Likelihood of success may be demonstrated through a variety of means including: relevant work experience, letter of intent, achievement of NCEA standards in human biology, or an interview.

Applicants under 20 years should be a minimum of 17 years of age and have attained NCEA level 2. Applicants over 20 years at the time of enrolment will be considered where they can demonstrate the ability to suceed in the programme. 

To satisfactorily complete the New Zealand Certificate in Study and Career Preparation (Level 3), and be awarded this qualification the student must successfully achieve:

  • A minimum of 60 credits in accordance with the programme schedule for the New Zealand Certificate in Study and Career Preparation (Level 3)
  • The student will normally be expected to complete the New Zealand Certificate in Study and Career Preparation (Level 3) full-time over six months or part-time over two years.

Please Note: Students failing to engage in study as per programme requirements may forfeit Zero Fees entitlement.

Graduates will be prepared for further study in the New Zealand Certificate in Study and Career Preparation (Applied Health Sciences Programme of Study) Level 4).

After completing both certificates, students could pursue further study (at diploma or degree level) in health and science related subjects, such as NursingMassageSport and Exercise, and Midwifery (not available at SIT).

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