Bachelor of Hotel Management

Bachelor of Hotel Management

Study the Bachelor of Hotel Management to become a leader in hospitality and tourism. This degree concentrates on management concepts such as marketing, operations, human resources, food and beverage, event management, legislation, entrepreneurship and financial accounting. 

18/07/2022 11:59:00 PM -- 2022-08-14 10:49:29.885
Enrol for Invercargill
1/02/2024 11:59:00 PM -- 2022-08-14 10:49:29.885
Enrol for Queenstown
Enrol
Enrol via email
Enquire
Key Details
Queenstown
Qualification:
Degree
Level:
7
Credits:
360
Duration:

Three years full-time,

part-time study is also available

Study Modes:
On Campus
Dates:

2022 Intake 2: 11 April to 10 June

2022 Intake 3: 20 June to 19 August

2022 Intake 4: 29 August to 28 October

2022 Intake 5: 07 November to 03 February 2023

2023 Semester 1: 13 February to 14 April

2023 Semester 2: 24 April to 23 June

2023 Semester 3: 03 July to 01 September

2023 Semester 4: 11 September to 10 November

2023 Semester 5: 20 November 23 February 2024

Fees:

This programme is eligible for the Zero Fees Scheme.

The Bachelor of Hotel Management equips students for supervisory and management positions within the accommodation, hospitality and tourism related sectors, nationally and internationally.

You will study marketing, operations, human resources, food and beverage, event management, legislation, entrepreneurship and financial accounting, focussing on management concepts and using a blend of theoretical and practical learning that emphasises applied knowledge.

The theory, assessments, field trips and internship allows students to experience the industry first hand and prepares them for employment in hotel and tourism management positions.

Year One 

DDT501 Principles of Tourism (15 credits)

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:
1. Define and evaluate the main concepts which characterise tourism and apply these to range of issues
relevant to tourism.
2. Assess the various sectors that make up the tourism industry as an integral part of tourism investigations.
3. Evaluate the various types of tourists and factors which shape their behaviour within tourism
environments.
4. Define and analyse whole tourism systems, demonstrating awareness of the patterns and trends in tourism
locally and globally to support decision making in the industry.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

1. Define and evaluate the main concepts which characterise tourism and apply these to range of issues relevant to tourism.

2. Assess the various sectors that make up the tourism industry as an integral part of tourism investigations.

3. Evaluate the various types of tourists and factors which shape their behaviour within tourismenvironments.

4. Define and analyse whole tourism systems, demonstrating awareness of the patterns and trends in tourismlocally and globally to support decision making in the industry.

DDT504 Principles of Tourism Marketing (15 credits)

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

1. Identify and analyse what drives consumer value within various travel and tourism industries and how to capture that value through the marketing mix.

2. Assess the impact of technologies on marketing operations within the travel and tourism sector.

3. Identify and analyse environmental factors and information affecting marketing decision making within tourism and travel contexts.

4. Develop and evaluate marketing plans for travel or tourism businesses utilising established theories of marketing to contribute to improved visitor experiences.

DDT503 Principles of Tourism Management (15 credits)

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

1. Identify key roles and functions of management applicable to travel or tourism based organisations.

2. Analyse applied management concepts and theories and develop strategies to address management and workplace practice issues within travel or tourism operations.

3. Identify resources, capabilities and legislative requirements of travel or tourism organisations in relation to their external environment.

4. Develop management goals, objectives and strategic plans for travel or tourism operations with specific focus on delivering quality visitor experiences.

DDT506 Financial Analysis for Tourism (15 credits)

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

1. Interpret major financial reports for management and external users, including major parts of companies’ annual reports.

2. Identify and use basic accounting language used in English-speaking countries and review accounting information applicable to tourism operations.

3. Demonstrate analytical thinking in financial matters, as well as an ability to work with and to present basic financial data.

4. Evaluate basic accounting practices for application in tourism and travel industries.

DDT507 Tourism and Travel Operations (15 credits)

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

1. Evaluate travel, hospitality and visitor services sectors relating to the tourism industry.

2. Assess the ‘proactive approach’ to managing and providing quality customer service.

3. Review the significance of “Sales and Service” associated with tourism operations management and discuss the importance of developing a service-orientated organisation.

4. Analyse laws and regulations that impact on tourism and travel operations.

DDT505 Human Resource Management for Tourism (15 credits)

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

1. Evaluate the main functions of human resource management and the impacts of key legislation on human resource management practices within a tourism and travel context.

2. Analyse employment obligations and responsibilities within travel or tourism operations environments.

3. Examine how effective human resource management can contribute to the overall efficiency and strategic goals of organisations.

4. Assess staff training needs and implement policies todevelop a culture of service excellence to contribute to positive visitors’ experiences.

DDT502 Principles of Communication (15 credits)

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

1. Apply an understanding of communication theories and principles to tourism and travel business settings.

2. Demonstrate and apply knowledge of students’ own and others’ self-concept, interpersonal and group communication skills.

3. Apply knowledge of effective teamwork theories and practices within tourism and travel business settings.

4. Prepare and deliver professional oral presentations on relevant topics within tourism and travel contexts, reflecting cultural, language, and demographic considerations.

5. Apply writing skills to produce professional documents in tourism and travel business contexts.

6. Apply knowledge of cultural aspects of communication to support visitor experiences.

DDT508 Managing the Visitor Experience (15 credits)

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:

1. Assess and apply theoretical methodologies to visitor management within the tourism and travel environment.

2. Critically analyse and evaluate relevant and current visitor management issues within the tourism and travel industry.

3. Analyse technologies that can be applied to enhance the visitor experience for tourism or travel operations.

4. Evaluate and utilise appropriate tools and strategies for creating visitor experience models for tourism or travel operations.

On successful completion of this paper, students will be able to:1. Define and evaluate the main concepts which characterise tourism and apply these to range of issuesrelevant to tourism.2. Assess the various sectors that make up the tourism industry as an integral part of tourism investigations.3. Evaluate the various types of tourists and factors which shape their behaviour within tourismenvironments.4. Define and analyse whole tourism systems, demonstrating awareness of the patterns and trends in tourismlocally and globally to support decision making in the industry.

Year Two 

DTT601 Contemporary Tourism Operation (15 credits)

The paper will enable students to develop a critical understanding of tourism markets, and the wider tourism landscape, on a local, national and international scale and appreciate the complexities external factors like globalisation and mass tourism can have on travel and tourism operations.

DTT602 Tourism Policy and Planning (15 credits)

The paper will enable students to understand how tourism policy and strategy, guides, shapes and drives sustainable tourism operations in local, national and international environments and  provide them with the skills and knowledge to critique tourism policy and planning in existing travel and tourism organisations.

DTT603 Leadership and Management in Tourism (15 credits)

The paper will enable students to develop a critical understanding of leadership and management roles in organisations and the role of the leadership team in the change management functions of travel and tourism operations.

DTT604 Public Relations in Tourism (15 credits)

The paper will enable students to develop a critical understanding of public relations (PR) concepts and theories and how PR is used in business, and how effective PR campaigns can enhance business operations across the travel and tourism sector.

DTT605 Environmentally Sustainable Management (15 credits)

The paper will enable students to develop a critical understanding of the environmental impact of tourism and recognise the responsibility of travel and tourism operators to develop and follow business models that engage in environmentally sustainable practices.

DTT608 Business Investment Strategy (30 credits)

This paper provides students with the skills and knowledge to create strategic investment strategies that enable travel and tourism operations to meet their long-term strategic goals. Students will be able to analyse business performance, conduct competitive analysis, assess and develop growth strategies and produce metrics to continually monitor and evaluate investment strategies.

DTT606 The Visitor Experience (15 credits)

The paper will provide students with the skills and knowledge to plan, design, and develop effective sustainable business systems, processes and practices that enable the commercial development of high-quality visitor experiences across the travel and tourism sector.

Year Three 

Compulsory Papers

HTM704 Contemporary Issues in Hotel Management

HTM706 Sustainability in Tourism

MKT776 Event Management

MAN734 Strategic Management

MKT772 Strategic Marketing

MAN735 Advanced Human Resource Management

IBS790 International Business

ETH760 Business Ethics

Graduates of the Bachelor of Hotel Management will be well suited for employment in a supervisory or management capacity within the accommodation, hospitality and tourism related sectors, including hotels, resorts, restaurants and convention centres.

Recent graduates of the Bachelor of Hotel Management have gained employment in accommodation, hospitality and tourism, and been promoted to supervisory positions with their current employers, or even successfully started their own small businesses.

School Leavers

University Entrance - NCEA Level 3: three subjects at Level 3, made up of:

  • 14 credits each, in three NZQA University Entrance approved subjects, and
  • Literacy – 10 credits at Level 2 or above, made up of five credits in reading and five credits in writing, and
  • Numeracy – 10 credits at Level 1 or above, made up of specified achievement standards through a range of subjects, or a package of three numeracy unit standards (26623, 26626, 26627 – all three required)

Mature Applicants

The entry requirements noted above may be applicable to mature entry applicants.  Adults over the age of 20 years who do not have the minimum entry requirements may be admitted if they can satisfy the teaching institution they are capable of studying at this level and have a reasonable chance of successfully completing each paper attempted.

English Language Requirements

Applicants, whose first language is not English, or who come from a country where the language of instruction in schools is not English, are required to provide evidence of having achieved one of the following

NCEA Level 3 with University Entrance, or

an International Baccalaureate Diploma or Cambridge A- level qualification for which the teaching and assessment was conducted in English; or

Cambridge Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA),or Trinity College London Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CertTESOL);or

Successful completion of all primary education (being the equivalent of New Zealand primary school years 1 to 8) and at least three years of secondary education (being the equivalent of three years from New Zealand secondary school years 9 to 13) at schools in either New Zealand,,Australia,Canada, the Republic of Ireland, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States one of the countries listed in Rule 18.5 where the student was taught using English as the language of instruction; or

Successful completion of at least five years of secondary education (being the equivalent of New Zealand secondary school years 9 to 13) at schools in either New Zealand, Australia, Canada, the Republic of Ireland, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States where the student was taught using English as the language of instruction; or

Successful completion of a Bachelor's Degree, Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma, Bachelor Honours degree, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma, Masters' Degree or Doctoral Degree, the language of instruction of which must be in English and which must be from a tertiary education provider from New Zealand, Australia, Canada, the Republic of Ireland, South Africa, the United Kingdom or the United States or

Successful completion of one of the following internationally recognised proficiency tests listed below to the level required of the programme of study and with all scores achieved in a single test during the two years preceding the proposed date of enrolment


IELTS test - Academic score of 6 with no band score lower than 5.5
TOEFL Paper based test (pBT) - Score of 550 (with an essay score 5 TWE)
TOEFL Internet based test (iBT) - Score of 60 (with a writing score of 18)
Cambridge English Examination - B2 First or B2 First for schools or C1 Advanced or C2 Proficiency with a score of 169. No less than 162 in each skill.
OET - Minimum of Grade C or 200 in all sub-tests
NZCEL - a) Expiring Level b) Current: a) Level 4 (Academic) b) Level 4 (Academic)
Pearson Test of English (Academic) - PTE (Academic) score of 50 with no band score lower than 42
Language Cert - C1 Expert International ESOL Written (LRW) PASS with no less than 25/50 in each skill and Spoken (S) PASS
Trinity ISE - ISE II with no less than distinction in any band

* New versions of some NZCEL qualifications, and in some cases new qualifications, were published on 13 June 2017. These are intended to replace pre-existing versions and qualifications, which have been given expiring status until discontinued on 31 December 2019. (a) denotes expiring (b) denotes current

Suggested Courses